Thursday, September 21, 2006

It's a cat's life


Hey, lady, some of us are trying to sleep here.


Well, if you absolutely insist on taking my picture ... how about some kitty p0rn?

~~~

When you're still awake, and even your supposedly nocturnal pet is crashed out on the couch, you know you've got a problem.

At least now I have time to finish the laundry and pack G's lunch for tomorrow.

2 comments:

Well-heeled mom said...

He is a beautiful kitty!

Anonymous said...

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